Some Sonic Frontiers bosses will seemingly be impossible to defeat before the player unlocks the ability to turn into Super Sonic – Sega has told us more about the unlockable form

Sonic Frontiers: You 'Can't Even Scratch' Some Bosses Until You Unlock Super Sonic


Some Sonic Frontiers bosses will seemingly be impossible to defeat before the player unlocks the ability to turn into Super Sonic.
Super Sonic – a more powerful, yellow form of Sonic first introduced in Sonic the Hedgehog 2 – was announced for Sonic Frontiers this week. It seems the form will be a key part of beating the game. Speaking to IGN Japan, Sonic Frontiers director Morio Kishimoto said players will encounter a handful of bosses in the open-zone game that "blue Sonic can't even scratch" before the power-up is unlocked.
"Normally in Sonic games you'll encounter a boss and you'll fight them as regular, blue Sonic. In Sonic Frontiers, there will be bosses that blue Sonic can't even scratch," Kishimoto said. "But if he collects and uses all seven Chaos Emeralds, he can become Super Sonic and then battle those bosses. Becoming Super Sonic will be the only way to fight them."
This mechanic was shown off in the game's new trailer that debuted at Tokyo Game Show (above), where Sonic in his regular form tries and fails to take on a gigantic enemy. He then turns into Super Sonic and returns, and Sega tells us that this mode features a completely different moveset for players to use.
Kishimito also suggested that a lot of these bosses will be of a much higher difficulty level to what players are used to. "Up until now, in Sonic games, Super Sonic would only appear against the last boss. Imagine if the first boss in Sonic Frontiers is as strong as those bosses," the director said.
Combat has been a big focus for Sega while making Sonic Frontiers with players needing to combine Sonic's speed and skills in order to overcome each enemy. The game will feature an extensive story as well, of course, featuring other major characters including Amy and Dr. Eggman.
The 10 Best Sonic GamesFew video game characters are as iconic as Sonic the Hedgehog. The speedy little blue blur has been around for over three decades, touching every corner of pop culture along the way, from games, to comics, to TV, to blockbuster movies. But we’re here specifically to celebrate the mainline Sonic game series and pick the best of them.
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Before we start, let’s quickly touch upon our criteria. We tried to rank these games based on a combination of historical significance, innovation, and how well these games stand the test of time. Some games, like Sonic Adventure 1 and the original Sonic the Hedgehog, for instance, are obviously super important to the Sonic series and set the foundation for both 2D and 3D Sonic games to follow, but we felt like they both didn’t quite hold up as well as their sequels when judged by a modern standard, which was why they just missed this list.
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The 10 games on this list are the ones we feel are the best examples of both classic and modern Sonic style. So with that said, here are our picks for the 10 best Sonic Games, as chosen by a handful of IGN’s biggest Sonic fans. 
<h3>10. Sonic Unleashed</h3>
Sonic Unleashed gets a bad rap, and conversation surrounding it often focuses on its weaker elements, specifically the werehog bits. A lot of the criticism is warranted, but it also shouldn’t entirely take away from the fact that when Sonic Unleashed is good, it’s some of the best 3D Sonic there’s ever been. It also remains one of the best looking Sonic games despite being 14 years old, plus the sound track is fantastic, and above all else, Sonic Unleashed feels fast.
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It totally nails that sensation of being the fastest thing alive as you tear through levels leaving a trail of absolute destruction full of crushed boxes, tables, enemies, and more. It’s the most uneven of the mainline Sonic games, but we still feel it deserves a spot on this list.<h3>9. Sonic Rush</h3>
Sonic Rush somehow managed to feel like a full blown console Sonic game, paired down for the dual screens of the Nintendo DS. A worthy successor to the amazing Sonic Advance games for the Gameboy Advance, Sonic Rush achieved a spectacular sense of speed for a handheld Sonic game thanks to the “Tension Gauge,” a mechanic that would later be adapted to future Sonic games as a boosting mechanic, and when you add on top of that the awesome boss battles and the great use of the dual screens throughout levels, it more than secures its number 9 spot. <h3>8. Sonic the Hedgehog 2</h3>
Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is still one of the best pure experiences of the Sonic franchise. It introduced Tails, added two-player coop, and improved upon the formula established by the first game in just about every way.  There were more zones, most featuring multiple paths, new enemies, new mechanics, and abilities while keeping true to the essential factor of a Sonic game: you gotta go fast.
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New zones like Sky Chase gave us our first look at the Tornado (Tails' Biplane), and the Death Egg zone pitted us against an early version of an enemy that eventually became Metal Sonic. Sonic 2 also introduced the Super Sonic transformation into the franchise by having players collect all seven chaos emeralds in a new and welcomed improvement to bonus stages. Sonic 2 is still one of the best sequels with its lengthy list of improvements and additions that still holds up to this day for both newcomers and veterans.<h3>7. Sonic CD</h3>
As good as we just said Sonic 2 was, Sonic CD feels like a more polished and confident version of that. It introduced us to Amy Rose and the version of Metal Sonic that we all know and loathe today. But the real star of the show in Sonic CD is its use of time travel, where you can go to the past, present, or future of the zone you’re in.
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The thrill of starting the time travel star boost and trying to maintain your speed to make sure you properly get transported to the past or future was always exciting. You never knew if you were going to successfully get to where you were going, and that was part of the adventure. Sonic CD didn't need this extra gameplay mechanic but they did it anyway, and since Sonic is trying to collect the time stones to ensure a good future where Eggman's plans are foiled, Sonic CD basically did Avengers: Endgame in 1993. … Also that theme song? Iconic.<h3>6. Sonic 3 And Knuckles</h3>
The Genesis-era Sonic games are well represented on this list for a reason, and each release got better while introducing new playable characters and mechanics. Sonic 3 & Knuckles feels like a superior experience of the early days of Sonic. While both are solid games as individuals, they feel incomplete, and so the combination offers a complete and rich experience. The level design is some of the best in the 2D Sonic entries. While it certainly felt built and made for newcomer Knuckles, the levels still accommodate the playstyles and strengths for that of Sonic and Tails.
Ryan Dinsdale is an IGN freelancer. He'll talk about The Witcher all day.
This story originally appeared on: IGN - Author:Ryan Dinsdale

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