We sat down with Game of Thrones and House of the Dragon composer Ramin Djawadi to discuss the legacy of the franchise and what it was like jumping into the world again with brand new characters

House of the Dragon: Composer Ramin Djawadi on Why He Kept the Game of Thrones Opening Music


As our State of Streaming 2022 event continues, IGN’s David Griffin sat down with Game of Thrones and House of the Dragon composer Ramin Djawadi to discuss the legacy of the franchise and what it was like jumping into the world again with brand new characters.
When the series started anew and fans heard the opening theme in full, there was a lot of chatter over House of the Dragon’s music being the same as that of Game of Thrones. Whether you’re glad for the familiarity or bummed there wasn’t a new intro to get fans hyped for the upcoming episode, there was a method to Djawadi’s madness.
For our full convo with Djawadi, check out the video below or at the top of the page:
“I think that’s a good example of tying back the old material with the new,” he says of the theme. “As a franchise to just connect all of these stories together. In the original main title, we always looked at and thought of it as an overarching theme that connects all of the characters and the journey and the adventures of this universe. So we felt it would be appropriate to connect it with this main title theme again.”
Just because the original intro music remains the same doesn’t mean that Djawadi isn’t producing new and enticing new music for the franchise. When it comes to the character themes, each is unique outside of their connection to the overarching theme.
Melodically I’m starting from scratch, but sonically I’m drawing back from the original score
“Melodically I’m starting completely from scratch, but sonically I’m drawing back from the original score,” explains Djawadi. “There are certain sounds that I will use that I would have used with the Targaryen's in the past.”
Every Dragon in Game of Thrones: House of the DragonHouse of the Dragon will depict dragons wielded as both protectors of various Targaryen factions but also as almighty weapons wielded in a war dubbed the Dance of the Dragons, a years-long campaign for succession among the various Targaryen claimants to the Iron Throne – a war that will prove tragic for all involved, human and dragon alike.
<br>
<br>
The following is a list of all the dragons that appeared during the Dance of the Dragons. Some have already debuted on House of the Dragon, while many others aren’t expected to appear for several more seasons due to the significant passages of time chronicled in Fire & Blood.<B>Balerion the Black Dread</B>
<br>
<br>
The largest and eldest of all the Targaryen dragons, Balerion was flown by Aegon the Conqueror and later became the steed of King Viserys I. The black and red mal dragon has died by the time House of the Dragon begins, but his massive skull can be seen on display at the Red Keep.<B>Caraxes</B>
<br>
<br>
Dubbed the Blood Wyrm, this huge, red, and horned beast is the steed of Prince Daemon Targaryen (Matt Smith) and is as fearsome and vicious as his rider.<B>Syrax</B>
<br>
<br>
As described in George R.R. Martin’s official companion book The World of Ice & Fire: The Untold History of Westeros and the Game of Thrones, the yellowish Syrax is the “huge and formidable” female steed of Princess Rhaenyra (portrayed in House of the Dragon by Milly Alcock as a youth and Emma D’Arcy as an adult).<B>Meleys</B>
<br>
<br>
“The Red Queen” is the steed of The Queen Who Never Was, Princess Rhaenys (played in House of the Dragon by Eve Best). Meleys is described in The World of Ice & Fire as “old and cunning, lazy, but fearsome when roused.”<b>Sunfyre</B>
<br>
<br>
With his golden scales and flame, it’s no wonder this huge and formidable male dragon is dubbed “Sunfyre the Golden.” He is the steed of Aegon II Targaryen (who will be played in House of the Dragon as an adult by Tom Glynn-Carney and as a youth by Ty Tennant).
Fans can expect the series’ score to continue to subvert expectations, too. Viewers will be kept on their toes throughout the series with themes that will keep you guessing throughout.
“The music has always played a big role in Game of Thrones,” says Djawadi. “The music can guide the audience, and it can mislead the audience. So the original Game of Thrones we played very close attention to how we did the narration with music. We’re definitely planning on doing the same thing here.”
Follow along with the rest of our State of Streaming coverage as the event unfolds!

Amelia is the entertainment Streaming Editor here at IGN. She's also a film and television critic who spends too much time talking about dinosaurs, superheroes, and folk horror. You can usually find her with her dog, Rogers. There may be cheeseburgers involved. Follow her across social @ThatWitchMia.
This story originally appeared on: IGN - Author:Amelia Emberwing

Recent Search