Toshimichi Mori, the creator of the BlazBlue series, has left Arc System Works after almost 20 years and is looking to potentially create a new game

Blazblue Creator Toshimichi Mori Leaves Arc System Works


BlazBlue series creator Toshimichi Mori has departed from Arc System Works after almost 20 years. He started working for the company in 2003.
“I have something to report to all of the users. I, Toshimichi Mori, have left Arc System works, the company I worked at for many years,” Mori says on Twitter (translated by Gematsu). “I first joined Arc System works after working on Guilty Gear X as an employee of PicPac, and I cherish many of the experiences I have had during my 20 years there, whether it was working for various fighting game titles, developing my own title BlazBlue, or connecting with many of our users.”
He continues, “I have nothing but gratitude towards the staff of Arc System Works and others who have worked with me, as well as all the users who supported us. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I will depart from Arc System Works. This may cause some feelings of anxiety, especially among fans of the BlazBlue series. For this, I sincerely apologize.”

However, Mori also explains that he isn’t done with video games just yet. At the moment, he’s thinking of creating a game for BlazBlue fans in some sort of fashion, and he’s going to focus on that endeavor going forward.
Many veteran developers in the Japanese video game industry have moved on from places where they first established their names or have retired recently. Earlier this year, Yakuza series creator Toshihiro Nagoshi left SEGA to establish his own studio with NetEase. Kingdom Hearts and Final Fantasy producer Shinji Hashimoto left Square Enix back in May.
In other Arc System Works news, Guilty Gear Xrd REV2 is getting rollback netcode on PC.
The 10 Best Fighting GamesFighting games have a special place in both the past and present of gaming. It’s a genre that requires quick thinking, twitch reflexes, and vast amounts of knowledge of both yourself and your opponent’s options to play at a high level. It can often seem intimidating. But some of the most recognizable series in pop culture, such as Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat, belong to that same genre. 
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So for our deliberations in assembling this list, we’ve laid out some special criteria: we’ve excluded platform fighters such as the Smash Bros series as that’s important enough to be a list on its own; we only have one game representing each series, and while legacy can play a big part, they must offer robust mechanics and still be fun to play today. Here’s our list of the top 10 fighting games.<h3>10. Mortal Kombat (2011)</h3>
Mortal Kombat 9 marked a turning point in the history of MK. It was a reboot – not just of its story, but of everything that defined Mortal Kombat over the years. Puzzle Kombat, Motor Kombat, and weird Create-a-Fatalities were all gone in lieu of a back-to-basics approach that focused on the actual kombat above all else.
It turned out to be the best possible decision for the series, because Mortal Kombat 9 brought the legendary fighting series back from the brink, thanks to its excellent story mode, copious amounts of fanservice, and redone mechanics that laid the foundation for subsequent games to follow.
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It certainly was not the most balanced fighting game in the world, but that was part of its charm, and its imperfections are actually one of the reasons why many fans still prefer MK9 to this day.<h3>9. Skullgirls</h3>
Even just a passing glance at Skullgirls in motion will tell you that this isn’t your average indie fighting game. But there’s more to Skullgirls than just its looks. Skullgirls has one of the most flexible fighting game systems ever made. Every character has a ton of different combo routes, and you can play as a solo character with increased health and damage, a balanced duo team, or fill up your squad with three characters that are weaker, but offer the advantage of extra assists and combo extensions. Add in memorable character design, art style, and music on top of silky smooth gameplay, and it’s no wonder Skullgirls still thrives 10 years later.<h3>8. Virtua Fighter 5 Ultimate Showdown</h3>
Virtua Fighter 5 Final Showdown was the final arcade and console iteration of Sega’s premier 3D fighter, until Ultimate Showdown rebuilt the game on Yakuza’s Dragon Engine for modern consoles. Often credited with greatly influencing or even creating the 3D fighter genre, Virtua Fighter is foundational to video games. The likes of Yu Suzuki (creator of Shenmue and Space Harrier) and Toshihiro Nagoshi (longtime head of the Yakuza series) helped craft a series focused on grounded martial arts, vast movement, attack, and counter options, and characters that became instantly iconic.
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Virtua Fighter 5 represents the peak of this design, with gameplay that still feels true to its roots, yet distinct from any other fighter out there, and improves on the series’ online features. And although some single-player offerings have been removed from earlier versions of Virtua Fighter 5, Ultimate Showdown is the easiest way to play the latest entry on modern hardware. With incredibly high ceilings for execution, such as moves that require input windows as small as one sixtieth of a second, and characters that are fun to just mash buttons on, Virtua Fighter 5 Ultimate Showdown is a must-play for fans of 3D fighters and the genre as a whole.<h3>7. Killer Instinct (Xbox One)</h3>
2013’s Killer Instinct proved the series was more than the Mortal Kombat imitator some claimed it to be. It was one of the first mainstream fighting games to integrate rollback netcode and its online play is still among the smoothest around. Its Dojo mode is the best teaching tool the genre has ever seen - it doesn’t just teach you how to play Killer Instinct; it teaches you how to play fighting games, full stop, and is required reading for anyone trying to learn the genre. What’s more, Killer Instinct is packed with great single-player content, and no matter how you play, it looks great and has a killer soundtrack by Mick Gordon. 
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But whether you’re yelling along with the announcer while pulling off an Ultra Combo, landing a perfectly timed Combo or Counter Breaker, or just learning a new character in training mode, Killer Instinct feels great to play and has the technical depth any great fighter needs while remaining unique. Now if only Microsoft would release a sequel…<h3>6. Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3</h3>
Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 is set apart by its character balance (or lack thereof) and team construction. Many of the characters are broken in a way that only Marvel can get away with, and being able to put three of these characters together, each with one of three assist options, in varying orders, creates a sandbox of possibilities.
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You can be in complete control as you perfectly execute an infinite combo one game and question your life decisions as you’re stuck blocking Soul Fists nonstop without having a chance to move the next game. You can start a game off with a mixup leading to a death combo, mixup your opponent's next character into another death combo, and make one execution error on their third character just watch your whole team die to a lvl.3 X-Factor comeback. It’s brutal and unforgiving, but that feeling of being all-powerful is worth it. It’s fast, flashy, and the combo system is ridiculous. It will garner your attention and take you for a ride.
George Yang is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter @yinyangfooey
This story originally appeared on: IGN - Author:George Yang

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