Destiny 2 Anti-Cheating Legal Battle Seems to Lean In Bungie's Favour

Bungie's anti-cheating legal battle appears to be leaning in the Destiny 2 developer's favour after the court ruled against cheats company AimJunkies' retaliation suit.


Bungie's anti-cheating legal battle appears to be leaning in the Destiny 2 developer's favour after the court ruled against cheats company AimJunkies' retaliation suit.
As reported by TorrentFreak (and spotted by Eurogamer), U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Zilly sided with Bungie after AimJunkies accused the developer of hacking the computer of one cheat developer called James May.
"May has failed to sufficiently allege that Bungie accessed his personal computer and files without authorization," Judge Zilly said. "To support his allegation that Bungie accessed his personal computer, May relies on a document that Bungie purportedly produced during discovery in this matter."
He continued: "May, however, does not explain what this document is or how it evidences instances in which Bungie allegedly accessed his computer without authorization and downloaded his personal information."
Though the case is ongoing and could still fall in either party's favour, this dismissal is likely to damage AimJunkies case in the initial lawsuit filed by Bungie. The developer filed the lawsuit last year, saying that AimJunkies violated its copyright laws by producing cheats.
Bungie's claim was called "ridiculous and absurd" by the cheats company who said "Bungie and their counsel apparently believe the more s**t you throw at the wall, the greater the possibility of something sticking with the court."
It's unclear when or how the lawsuit will be resolved, but Bungie recently reached an agreement with another cheats company called Elite Boss Tech that was forced to pay $13.5 million in damages.
Bungie has taken a no nonsense approach to any signs of cheating or misleading in its Destiny 2 community, as evidenced by these two lawsuits and another in which Bungie issued a virtual manhunt for someone who issued YouTubers with fake DMCA takedown, eventually suing the individual for $7.6 million.

Ryan Dinsdale is an IGN freelancer. He'll talk about The Witcher all day.
This story originally appeared on: IGN - Author:Ryan Dinsdale

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